Military Connection: Retroactive Scholarships for Vets: By Joe Silva

LNVBAmerican’s take great pride in the Department of Veterans Affairs statistic claiming that over one million Veterans have gone to college or vocational training through the Post-9/11 GI Bill. While this data is accurate, it leads to the misconception that every Veteran is entitled to a free college education through the GI Bill. But, sadly, this is not so.

It’s true that the Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most complete and most generous Veteran education benefit to date. The most current GI Bill will cover the complete cost of tuition at a state college or university, or up to $20,235 in tuition per year at private schools. The benefit also pays recipients a housing allowance that is equal to BAH for E-5 with dependents for the zip code of the school, as well as a $1,000 per year stipend for books and supplies. The benefit is available for a total of 36 months to Veterans who have served since September 11, 2001.

But not every Veteran is eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Also, the benefit does not pay for student loans already accrued. So, while 1 million Veterans and counting are reaping the rewards from a tremendously generous VA benefit, there are many, many more struggling with tuition payments and student loans.

The VA estimates that there are approximately 22 million Veterans in the U.S. There are also more than 1.3 million service members on active duty, and more than 850,000 members of the Reserves.  Despite the fact that over 1 million Veterans have received free tuition, there are still over 20 million Veterans who may be in need of tuition assistance. Additionally, there are over 2 million service members between current active duty personnel and Reservists who may have student loans that won’t get paid by the GI Bill.

Veterans who are facing financial hardships due to uncovered tuition payments and student loans should research Leave No Veteran Behind (LNVB), a Chicago based nonprofit organization that offers Retroactive Scholarships to Veterans.

The LNVB Retroactive Scholarship is a highly sought after scholarship open to eligible Veterans who meet the criteria, which includes: the completion of a degree or vocational program, existing loans from a lending institution for education costs, and a letter explaining the financial or personal/family hardship that their education debt has created. LNVB scholarship recipients must also be willing to agree to complete 100-400 hours of community service.

Veterans interested applying for the LNVB Retroactive Scholarship should click here to apply.

Patriotic Americans and Veterans interested in contributing to the education of Veterans are invited to DONATE what they can.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Retroactive Scholarships for Vets: By Joe Silva

Military Connection: VA Tops 21 Million Home Loans: By Debbie Gregory

VA 21 Million loansAs of October, 2014, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has guaranteed 21 million home loans for Veterans since the Home Loan Guaranty program was established in 1944. The program was one of the original benefits of the original Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the “GI Bill.”

This colossal milestone for the VA comes during its year-long commemoration, celebrating 70 years of the “GI Bill.” The bill established a wide range of benefits for Veterans returning from World War II. The original GI Bill provided zero-down, low-interest home loans, as well as education and vocational training benefits.

The VA Home Loan Program provides housing and home loan related benefits and services for eligible Veterans, service members and surviving spouses, in order to make home ownership possible and affordable. The majority of all VA loans are made with zero down payments.

In fiscal year 2014, the VA Home Loan Program guaranteed around 35,000 loans per month, resulting in a total of 438,398 VA home loans guaranteed for the year. The total value of all outstanding VA loans is over $380 billion. The program also approved 1,253 grants to disabled Veterans for the purchase, modification, *or* construction of a home adapted to meet their individual housing needs.

Despite what many people believe, the VA does not give loans directly to Veterans. The VA partners with approved lenders who provide the loans to eligible Veterans, and essentially vouches for the Veteran. Data from the Mortgage Bankers Association shows that mortgages guaranteed by the VA Home Loan Program had the lowest foreclosure rate for more than the last five years, when compared to all other types of home loans in the nation, including prime loans. But the VA will assume part of the responsibility on the rare occasion when a Veteran is unable to pay off a VA loan.

Through GI Bill home loans and other loan serving efforts, the VA has helped 21 million Veterans fulfill their dream of becoming homeowners, and for many more, keep that dream alive. In Fiscal 2014, through loan servicing efforts, the VA Home Loan Program also helped nearly 80,000 Veteran borrowers to avoid foreclosure.  These actions saved taxpayers close to $2.8 billion in avoided claim payments.

Veterans can obtain a certificate of eligibility for a VA-guaranteed home loan through the VA Home Loan Program at: www.benefits.va.gov/homeloans.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: VA Tops 21 Million Home Loans: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Sullivan University Recognized: By Joe Silva

Sullivan UAs service members transition out of the military, there are very few who find or even want civilian careers in the field of their military occupational specialty.  That is why education benefits for Veterans, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill, are so important today. But what good are these benefits and securing an education if they don’t provide Veterans with the necessary tools to have successful post-military careers in the fields of their choosing?

That is what sets the Sullivan University System apart from other schools. Sullivan University has a long standing tradition of turning Veterans into professionals. Sullivan’s dedication to its military students is gaining attention.

For all that the school and staff do for Veterans, Sullivan was awarded the “2014 Veterans School Salute” by MilitaryConnection.com. And recently, Sullivan was also named one of the 2015’s “Best for Vets” Career and Technical Colleges by Military Times.

And the Sullivan University System, as well as three of its member schools, has been recognized as a Military Friendly School. Along with The Sullivan University System (which includes Sullivan’s Fort Knox Campus) the Sullivan College of Technology and Design, Spencerian Louisville and Spencerian Lexington have all been named by Victory Media—publisher of “G.I. Jobs” and the Guide to Military Friendly Schools—as Military Friendly Schools for 2015.

The 2015 Military Friendly Schools list honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools doing the most to embrace America’s military service members and student veterans.

Since 1982, Sullivan University has had a strong relationship with the U.S. Army. That year, the leadership at Fort Knox recruited the faculty at Sullivan to train their cooks in culinary arts. Over the past 32 years, that relationship has blossomed. The dedicated professionals at Sullivan have celebrated many successes among their military and Veteran students.

Sullivan is committed to setting a career course for their students who are active-duty military, Veterans, members of the National Guard and Reserve, or military family members. The school’s six campuses, as well as its online program, accept the following: Post-9/11 GI Bill (CH.33), Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP, CH.32), Vocational Rehabilitation (CH.31), Montgomery GI Bill (CH.30), MGIB-Select Reserve (Ch.1606), Reserve Education Assistance Program (REAP, CH.1607), Dependents Education Assistance Program (Ch.35), as well as GI Bill benefits that have been transferred to military dependents. In addition, Sullivan offers a number of private grants and scholarships for active-duty service members and Veterans whose tuition is not fully covered by other programs.

Along with affordable tuition, the service and programs offered at Sullivan are among the most Veteran-friendly in the country. The faculty and staff at Sullivan University believe that when it comes to education, one size does not fit all. That is why the school dismisses the “cookie cutter” education mentality, helping students create the academic plan that is individually suited to meet their goals and their needs.

If you are currently serving and thinking about your next career move, or are a Veteran looking to take the first steps towards your successful civilian life, visit www.sullivan.edu and see how Sullivan University Systems can help you get the professional training you need for the career that you deserve.

Military Connection: Sullivan University Recognized: By Joe Silva

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Bill to Help GI Bill Vets: By Debbie Gregory

HR 5589With the influx of Veteran students on college campuses, many institutions of higher education have established a centralized location where GI bill students can have all of their academic needs met. Legislation currently making its way through the House would implement an incentive for all schools to create and maintain Veteran centers on their campuses.

The Veteran Education Empowerment Act, H.R. 5589, is a bipartisan bill that directs the Secretary of Education to create a system that awards four-year grants to colleges and universities that establish and maintain a center for their GI Bill students.  In order to be eligible for the grants, the institutions would need to have a population of 15,000 students, with at least 1% of the population being Veteran students, active-duty military or military dependents. Further eligibility would require the schools be located in areas with significant Veteran populations, implementing programs that assist Veterans in the local community, and having a sustainability plan which demonstrates the schools’ plan for maintaining the center, even after the grant is expended.

H.R. 5589 defines a “Veteran Student Center” as a dedicated space that provides these students with a lounge or meeting place, or a centralized office that is staffed by trained employees that is dedicated to serving Veterans on campus. To meet the criteria for grant eligibility, the Veteran Education Empowerment act will require these centers to provide GI Bill students with the tools to succeed at school, transition into student life, and eventually, the civilian workforce. They are also required to assist their students with obtaining federal and state Veterans benefits, as well as networking with other students.

According to the American Council on Education, which represents over 1,700 colleges and universities, providing a dedicated space to serve Veterans on campus is critical to a school’s efforts to provide for Veteran students. The problem is that many schools find it difficult to fund such a resource. Grants that would be provided by the  Veteran Education Empowerment Act would allow more schools to provide this invaluable resource to its Veteran student population.

H.R. 5589 is supported by many Veterans service organizations, Veteran advocates and educators, including The American Council on Education, the American Legion, Association of the United States Navy, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), the National Guard Association of the United States, the Student Veterans of America (SVA) and the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW).

The Veteran Education Empowerment Act was introduced in the House on September 18th, and is currently in the hands of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. Please contact your representative and urge them to support H.R. 5589 the Veteran Education Empowerment Act.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Bill to Help GI Bill Vets: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: GI Bill is NOT for Schools: By Debbie Gregory

GI Bill for VetsThe Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most current and most generous continuation of the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, originally enacted by the government in 1944. Since its 2009 inception, more than 1 million Veterans have used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to attend colleges, universities and trade schools. However, there has been growing concern that Veterans are not getting the education they deserve from the benefit they have earned.

But this time, it’s not the American public questioning the federal government about an insufficient offering. This time, it’s the federal government questioning the schools that are receiving the funds from the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The government wants to make sure that the schools are providing sufficient services to Veterans.

A July 30, 2014 report from the Senate’s Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on the GI Bill and for-profit schools shows just how seriously Washington is looking at Veteran education benefits. The main area of concern is the predatory behavior of some for-profit institutions, the lack of worth of some schools’ degree programs, and the increasing enrollment rates of GI Bill students that some of these schools are still managing to receive.

The study found that in the 2012-2013 academic year, eight of the top ten recipient schools were large, publicly traded companies that operate for-profit schools. These eight companies received a total of $2.9 billion in Post-9/11 GI Bill tuition money since the program began, including $975 million in 2012-2013, which accounted for 23% of the total GI Bill tuition money spent that year. Since 2009, the Veteran enrollment rate at private for-profit institutions has jumped from 23% to 31%, while Veteran enrollment at public and other not-for-profit schools has dropped from 62% to 50% over the same period.

There are many for-profit schools that go to great lengths to provide Veterans with a quality education. But there are plenty of GI Bill students who can’t finish their degree program within the time allotted by the GI Bill, despite being told by their admissions officer that their military experience would count as credit, allowing them to finish in time. There are also horror stories about the Veterans who have used their GI Bill to complete degree programs, only to find that employers and graduate schools won’t recognize a degree from that school, resulting in a worthless degree that was a waste of time, energy and GI Bill benefits.

Congressional legislators are hoping to eliminate situations like these. Again, not all for-profit schools are bad. But proactive measures are being put into place to ensure that the GI Bill benefits earned through military service are being put to use to benefit the Veteran, not the school.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: GI Bill is NOT for Schools: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Accelerated Learning for Vets: By Debbie Gregory

Accelerated learningOn September 10, 2014, the White House and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hosted a roundtable discussion, bringing together government, American industry, and education leaders. The topic of discussion was regarding how utilizing accelerated learning programs could help our nation’s military Veterans. The symposium was part of the White House’s Skills and Supplement Demand-Driven Training Initiative.

Accelerated learning is a non-traditional form of education that utilizes multiple learning styles in order to maximize learning effectiveness, and generate considerable advancements in skills and knowledge. Individuals, such as Veterans, who have had long gaps in their academic endeavors can pursue accelerated learning programs with a career or industry skills development focus in mind. Many accelerated learning programs that are currently available include accelerated certificate programs, apprenticeships, online courses and boot camps.

The VA is looking into using accelerated learning programs to enhance or replace traditional education programs for Veterans. During the initial period of exploration, the VA will focus on information technology programs due to the high demand for IT’s, optimizing Veterans’ chances for transitioning into successful careers.

The VA is attempting to develop a strategy that utilizes accelerated learning and tests its effectiveness for Veterans in projects over the next two years. In order to assist with formulating the program, collecting student data and evaluating its success, the VA will need to work in collaboration with educators and employers.

The White House and the VA plan to use the feedback provided at the roundtable discussion to maximize the effectiveness of the program.

Many Veterans and Veteran advocates have, for some time, been against the need for Veterans to go to college in order to use their benefits. Accelerated learning programs won’t likely get Veterans a degree, but they will eliminate the need for Veterans to spend several semesters taking classes simply for degree requirements in subjects that they will never need for their desired career. With a certification from an accelerated learning program, the VA hopes that Veterans will have a more direct route from the military to civilian employment.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Accelerated Learning for Vets: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Winning the GI Bill Invasion: By Joe Silva

Veteran student invasionColleges and universities: be on the lookout…more than a million Veterans are flooding campuses nationwide. And even more Veterans are on the way. How can you prepare?

According to the Student Veterans of America (SVA), more than 1.2 million Veterans have gone back to school using the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The SVA also claims that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has issued $43.1 billion in Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to Veterans. Those numbers are set to continue to climb as more Iraq and Afghanistan-era service members separate from the military at a rate of around 250,000 each year.

I, myself, am a college graduate by way of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and can speak firsthand of the increasing presence of Veterans on campuses  throughout the U.S.  This should drive home the point that schools wanting the VA’s tuition money need to step up their efforts to accommodate the needs of military Veterans.

Most colleges have made major progress in providing for Veteran students since 2008. Now, almost three-quarters of them have at least one member of their staff specifically dedicated to assisting Veterans. But there is always more that can be done to provide for military Veteran students.

Many schools have created a common gathering space for their Veteran students. Veteran Resource Centers, Veterans Affairs offices, lounges and study areas are becoming more and more common. Make sure that your school’s space is known to your Veterans, while still encouraging them to mingle with the rest of the student population. Interacting with other students contributes to a well-rounded education through the exchange of knowledge.

Along the same line, many schools with large Veteran populations have introduced events, forums and even courses that focus on inclusion,  and allow these students to field questions about the military from their classmates. Many Veterans won’t openly share with strangers what they have experienced, but if asked, they are happy to answer.

One final thing that schools can do for Veteran students is hire Veterans. With more than one million Veterans who have returned to college, there is a growing number of Veterans with degrees. The nation’s academic institutions can assist all students, especially Veteran students, by tapping in to this talent pool. From staffing administration offices and Veteran Resource offices, to tutoring centers and even classroom instructors, hiring qualified Veterans should be a top priority.

By showing Veterans that your school is dedicated to helping them succeed in their mission to earn a college degree, administrators can guarantee the continued enrollment of GI Bill students.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard &amp,amp, Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Winning the GI Bill Invasion: By Joe Silva

Military Connection: Better Way to Research GI Bill: By Debbie Gregory

GI Bill Comparison Tool upgradeOn Thursday August 28, 2014, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced the launch of an upgraded version of the GI Bill® Comparison Tool.

Since its initial release in February if this year, the GI Bill Comparison Tool has been making it easier for Veterans, service members, and military dependents to estimate their GI Bill education benefits and learn more about their prospective school. The tool has provided key information about the school and its tuition prices, as well as data on graduation&amp, borrowing rates for individual colleges and universities. The information provided by the GI Bill Comparison Tool helps Veterans choose the best education program to meet their needs and available benefit.

The VA estimates that over the past 6 months nearly 350,000 people have utilized the tool on VA’s GI Bill website.

The upgraded version of the GI Bill Comparison Tool provides the same wealth of information, but with added data. Along with the information already provided by the original tool, the new version is equipped with a more comprehensive benefits calculator.

The new GI Bill Comparison Tool now offers Veterans the ability to click on an option that says, “How much am I going to get?” after typing in their eligibility information and the name of their school of interest. This new option offers a complete breakdown of cost. It shows how much your education benefit will pay you per month (specific to the school’s zip code), how much book stipend a student can expect to receive, and the total of what is “paid to you” for the year.

The new option goes even further by calculating the school’s tuition &amp, fees cost and comparing the cost against your benefit, ultimately providing Veterans with the “out of pocket cost” that they would have to pay, if they attended the school with their benefit.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill will pay the entire tuition cost of a state school’s in-state tuition, or up to $20,235. Once that tuition cost is exceeded at a private college or out-of-state school, the rest of the tuition comes out of the Veteran student’s pocket. Knowing the information that the upgraded GI Bill Comparison Tool provides could save individual Veteran college students thousands of dollars each year.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Better Way to Research GI Bill: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Veteran Survey Findings: By Debbie Gregory

Veteran surveyIn July, the Veterans advocacy group Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA) released the findings of its 2014 Member Survey.

The IAVA is the first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to combat Veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. IAVA membership is dependent on participation in either Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom, but civilians and other Veterans may join in a supporter status.

For the 2014 IAVA Member Survey, an online questionnaire was completed by 2,089 Veteran members. Their feedback will be used to provide an insight into what the post-military experience has been like so far for our latest generation of combat Veterans.

Some of the notable results include that 53% of participants said that that they had experienced mental injury. There were 44% diagnosed with PTSD, and 18% diagnosed with TBI. Almost two thirds of the participants admitted to having a mental injury and claimed to be receiving treatment. More than two thirds of the participants who had a close friend or family member suggest they seek help for their mental injury did so. This emphasizes how important it is for family members to vocalize their concern.

Regarding their education benefits, 62% of participants claimed to have used the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Of those, 78% of the Veterans rated the benefit as GOOD or EXCELLENT.

Regarding mental health treatment, 72% of survey participants who use the VA healthcare system for their mental health claims said they were satisfied with their provider, and 91% of participants claim to be satisfied with their non-VA provider for mental health treatments.

Almost half of the participants claim to have known at least one Iraq or Afghanistan Veteran who has attempted suicide.

One in ten participants claimed to be unemployed, and 61% of the employed Veterans claimed to be satisfied with their jobs.

Of the Veterans who filed disability claims with the VA, 70% answered that they waited over 120 days for the VA to notify them of their claim.

There are dozens of pages of data regarding Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans revealed from this survey. It is highly recommended that Veterans read the entire survey to see that they are not alone in their struggles. It is also important for employers, community leaders and advocates to understand the results in order to gain an insight as to where and how they can best help Veterans.

Click here for the 2014 IAVA Member Survey. For more information on IAVA, click here.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Veteran Survey Findings:  By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Great News for GI Bill: By Debbie Gregory

Great news for GI BillThe recent passing of the VA reform bill is great news for Veteran students and military dependents who receive benefits! Along with improving VA healthcare and articulating measures to create more transparency and greater accountability within the VA, the $17 billion measure includes a provision that will have a huge impact for Veterans using their education benefits.

Currently, private and public schools are allowed to charge two separate tuition prices to their students. Most colleges and universities charge one price for students who are residents of the state where the school’s campus is located, and a higher rate for students who are residents from another state. Residency requirements are governed by state law, and differ around the country. But typically, anyone who can show proof (lease agreement, energy/water bill etc.) of living in a state for a minimum of one year can qualify for the in-state tuition rate.

Veterans who attempt to use their Post-9/11 GI Bill, or other Veteran education benefits, have faced challenges due to out-of-state tuition rates. Service members are stationed all over the world, and often move every few years. It is not uncommon for service members to move to entirely new locations when they separate, especially if their last duty station was outside of the 48 contiguous states. These Veterans, and those who want to attend a specific school due to their academic programs, are subjected to out-of-state tuition rates. Many Veterans and Veteran advocates argue, and rightfully so, that members of the military serve every state in the union.

Apparently, Congress agreed with the case made by the Veteran advocates, and have included provisions in the bill, on its way to the president, to make it easier for Veterans to receive in-state tuition rates.

Out-of-state tuition rates can make the yearly cost of tuition soar over the maximum paid by the benefit. The Post-9/11 GI Bill pays 100% of the tuition for in-state Veteran students attending a public school. The benefit is capped at just over $20, 000 for Veteran students attending a private school, or a school where they are considered a non-resident student.

While the legislation doesn’t mandate that all schools must grant Veterans the reduced rate, it does force their hands. The bill proposes to disapprove future benefits for all Veterans and their dependents at any public school that charges higher than in-state tuition rates to any Veteran who served more than 90 days active service, and separated less than three years before enrollment. Losing the Veteran tuition money from this benefit would cost schools an enormous amount of money.

There are already dozens of states and hundreds of individual institutions that have a history of only charging Veterans the in-state rate. Other schools and states claim that Congress is forcing them to take on extra expenses.

With the passing of the bill by Congress and with President Obama signing it into law on August 7, 2014, every public school will be subject to the federal legislation that will go into effect for school terms starting on or after July 1, 2015.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Great News for GI Bill:   By Debbie Gregory