U of Phoenix Under Investigation: Military Connection

Military Connection: University of Phoenix

By Debbie Gregory.

The Pentagon and the Department of Veterans Affairs are addressing widespread concern about the quality of education at for-profit colleges and unaccredited institutions. These schools have siphoned off billions of dollars in taxpayer-supported benefits for veterans and military personnel.

The University of Phoenix, the country’s largest benefactor of GI Bill funds, is under federal investigation for possible deceptive or unfair business practices, its parent company, Apollo Education Group, announced last month.

The investigation seeks to determine if “certain unnamed persons, partnerships, corporations, or others have engaged or are engaging in deceptive or unfair acts or practices in or affecting commerce in the advertising, marketing, or sale of secondary or postsecondary educational products or services or educational accreditation products or services.”

There are allegations that the University of Phoenix has paid the military for exclusive access to bases, held recruitment events disguised as résumé workshops, and included military insignias without the required permission on custom-engraved “challenge coins” handed out by recruiters.

Apollo group is the latest in a string of for-profit colleges being investigated by federal authorities for alleged impropriety. On May 12, the SEC announced fraud charges against ITT Tech and two of its top executives for allegedly lying to investors in an alleged scheme to cover up losses from student loans. Last April, the Department of Education levied $30 million in fines against Corinthian Colleges for inflating job placement numbers at its subsidiary colleges after an investigation for allegations of fraud. Corinthian shut down all 28 of its locations including Heald College, Everest College and WyoTech, leaving hundreds of veterans in the lurch after the parent company declared bankruptcy.

Since 2009, the school has reaped more than $1.2 billion in GI Bill money. Last year alone, it received $345 million to educate Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, along with $20 million in tuition assistance from the Pentagon.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their families. We are the go-to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go-to site.

U of Phoenix Under Investigation: Military Connection: by Debbie Gregory

Couple Embezzled Funds for Returning War Vets: Military Connection

Judith Paixao and Kevin Lombard

By Debbie Gregory.

A husband and wife were convicted by a federal jury of embezzling federal funds that were intended to provide job training, benefits and equipment for injured Marines returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

From 2007-2009, Judith Paixao and Kevin Lombard were directors of the Wounded Marine Careers Foundation, a tax-exempt entity that trained injured veterans for careers in the film industry.

The San Diego jury found the pair guilty of conspiracy to commit fraud, theft from an organization receiving federal funds, and filing false claims. Paixao was also convicted of mail fraud involving the Bob Woodruff Foundation. Paixao defrauded the Bob Woodruff Foundation of almost $100,000 by hiding the fact that one of the intended recipients, a Marine injured in Fallujah, had left the program, prosecutors said.

The pair fraudulently billed the Department of Veterans Affairs for personal expenses, including cellphone bills for relatives, a Caribbean vacation, meals in fancy restaurants, and a New Year’s Day sailing outing around San Diego Bay.

The VA was charged up to $88,000 per veteran for the 10-week course, according to evidence presented at trial. While they claimed to have donated more than $200,000 to start the foundation, the couple ended up taking more than $400,000 from the foundation’s accounts over the course of two years

The pair “capitalized on the misfortune of wounded Marines in their time of vulnerability and took advantage of the VA’s commitment to serving wounded veterans,” said U.S. Atty. Laura Duffy.

Under the name Wounded Marine Careers Foundation Inc., the program, listed as a nonprofit charitable organization, began in 2007 but lasted only three years.

The program folded amid accusations and legal claims by employees and students that the school had charged too much and exaggerated the possibilities of employment and membership in a Hollywood labor union.

Before it closed, the training program had received $1.2 million from the VA, prosecutors said.

Sentencing is set for Oct. 19.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their families. We are the go-to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go-to site.

Couple Embezzled Funds for Returning War Vets: Military Connection: by Debbie Gregory

Removing Education Roadblocks for Veterans: Military Connection

school

By Debbie Gregory.

As of July 1, 2015, 34 states and three territories have agreed to comply with Section 702 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act. This means that covered individuals using the Post-9/11 GI Bill or MGIB – AD at public institutions of higher learning (IHL) will be charged the resident rate for tuition and fees . Currently in compliance are:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Guam, Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, Pennsylvania, American Samoa, and Washington intend to comply.

Section 702 will assist veterans with more effectively utilizing their hard-earned education benefits. The cost for out of state tuition is often at least double, and sometimes triple, that of in-state tuition. Section 702 allows our nation’s veterans the freedom to return to civilian life as a student, without being penalized for where they choose to reside.

Those covered under the Choice Act are Veterans, their spouses or children who are living in the state where the IHL is located, and enroll in the school within three years of the service member’s discharge from a period of active duty service of 90 days or more.

Also covered are spouses or children using benefits under the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship who qualify as above.

The above compliant states and territories meet the statutory requirements as determined by VA. The states and schools not already in compliance will be extended additional time to make sure that GI Bill students may continue their education and training at their chosen institutions

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their families. We are the go-to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go-to site.

Removing Education Roadblocks for Veterans: Military Connection: by Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Model for Rating Veteran-Friendly Schools

Vet friendly schoolsBy Joe Silva

Since the implementation of the Post-9/11 GI Bill in 2009, more than one million individuals, including Veterans and dependents with transferred GI Bill benefits, have enrolled at institutions of higher education. And approximately 250,000 service members continue to separate from the military each year, the majority of whom will use their GI Bill to attend college. In response to all of these Veterans attending school through use of GI Bill benefits, many institutions have been vying for their federally paid tuition money, and the extra grant funding offered to schools that serve Veterans. Even with the best intentions in mind, some institutions have lost sight of the need to serve each Veteran student individually. It has become hard to tell which schools are actually out to help Veterans, and which are out solely to help themselves.

The Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency (MVAA) has come up with a possible solution for their state that could set the standard for the entire country. The MVAA has devised a rating system for colleges and universities that provides Veterans with a means to determine their prospective school’s track record for serving Veteran students.

The MVAA looks at criteria such as:

  • On-campus Veteran’s coordinator and/or staffed Veterans center
  • Active student-operated Veteran club/association
  • Established process for the identification of current student Veterans
  • Evaluation and awarding of credit for military training and experience
  • Veteran-specific website/portal
  • Monitoring and evaluation of student Veteran academic retention, completion and graduation rates
  • Monitoring and evaluation of student Veteran job placement rates

If a school has at least three of the above, the MVAA gives them a Bronze rating. If the school has four, they receive a Silver rating. If they are found to provide six or more of the above, schools are given a Gold rating. The ratings are announced by MVAA and placed on their website for Veterans to consider when they are researching schools to use their GI Bill.

While this rating system is currently only used in Michigan, it could be something to consider doing nationally, ideally by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), which administers Veteran education benefits. When using the VA’s GI Bill Comparison Tool, Veterans have access to information such as how many GI Bill students attend a particular school, if that school has a Veterans club/group, and if they are a Yellow Ribbon School. Also available is information such as whether the school is in compliance with the president’s “Principles of Excellence,” do they abide by the “8 Keys to Veterans Success,” and if the school has had any complaints made to the VA by way of Veteran student feedback. Furthermore, Veterans can see how the school is accredited, and view the amount of fees paid through the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Yellow Ribbon Program. All the VA would have to do to implement a program similar to the one that the MVAA has in place would be to calculate the data that it is already collecting.

Veteran students will still have a choice of where they want to attend, but knowing if their prospective school is or isn’t doing all that they can to serve their Veteran students could assist with the decision making process.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the ArmyNavyAir ForceMarinesCoast Guard,Guard and ReserveVeterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Boardinformation on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Model for Rating Veteran-Friendly Schools: By Joe Silva

Military Connection: Take Me Out to the Ball Game

thanks baseball

By Debbie Gregory.

There’s a lot to be said about the Washington Nationals. What other major league baseball team can say they have mascot versions of old Presidents? And have you ever eaten at Ben’s Chili Bowl? It’s a DC landmark because it sells incredibly delicious chili dogs and half-smokes, a variety of sausage popular in the area. Nationals Park features a Ben’s Chili Bowl. But how about discounted tickets for ThanksUSA supporters AND a $5 donation for each of those tickets sold? It doesn’t get much better than that!

The Washington Nationals are teaming up with ThanksUSA in support of military families. ThanksUSA supporters will enjoy online ticket discounts for every 2015 home game. For each ticket purchased, the Nats will donate $5 to the ThanksUSA Scholarship Fund.

To purchase discounted tickets, visit http://washington.nationals.mlb.com/ticketing/singlegame.jsp?c_id=was and select the game you want to attend. Enter the discount code THANKSUSA and click APPLY.

ThanksUSA stands for “Treasure Hunt Aiding Needs of Kids and Spouses of those serving the United States of America.

In the beginning, there was the first treasure hunt, and 2015 marks the 10th American history Treasure Hunt (TH10). TH10 will challenge your knowledge of World War I.  TH10 will be released in four installments through ThanksUSA’s website and an updatable mobile device application (Apple app). Each chapter will have its own theme, entry period, and prize drawing. Even though the hunt is at the halfway point, it’s not too late to join in on the fun. For more information, go to http://hunt.thanksusa.org/test/hunt/index.html

ThanksUSA is a non-partisan, charitable effort to mobilize Americans of all ages to “thank” the men and women of the United States armed forces. The organization provides college, technical and vocational school scholarships to the children and spouses of military personnel. To date, the national non-profit has awarded almost 3,400 post-secondary school scholarships, with a total value of over $10 million.

Military Connection: ThanksUSA Offering Scholarships to the Children and Spouses of U.S. Troops

ThanksUSABy Debbie Gregory.

ThanksUSA is on a mission to provide college, technical and vocational school need-based scholarships for the children and spouses of US military personnel.The national nonprofit organization gives the gift of education to America’s troops.

“Ten years after ThanksUSA was launched, we remain committed to helping military families flourish and advance their dreams through education,” ThanksUSA CEO and Chairman Bob Okun said in a press release.

Founded in 2005 by sisters Rachel and Kelsi Okun, ThanksUSA provides need-based scholarships to the children and spouses of service members across all the armed forces, including the reserves. They also give special consideration to families of the fallen and wounded. Over the past decade, the organization has raised more than $10 million, resulting in the giving nearly 3,400 scholarships.

When eight year Rachel and six year old Kelsi saw their neighbor, Colonel Lanier Ward, come back from Baghdad severely injured by an IED explosion, they were touched by the struggles Col. Ward and his family faced during his recovery. They saw an opportunity to thank the children and spouses of our U.S. military by providing them with educational scholarships.

ThanksUSA’s awards are made possible by donations and several campaigns and events throughout the year including; ThanksUSA Treasure Hunt, Jackson Casey Scholarship Fund, Tennis Thanks the Troops, and AthleticDNA.

Golden State Warrior Stephen Curry, a supporter of ThanksUSA’s mission to provide scholarships to our nation’s heroes, became ThanksUSA’s National Spokesperson in 2010.

ThanksUSA is a nonpartisan, charitable effort to mobilize Americans of all ages and gender, as a thank you for their service to the nation. The organization provides college, technical, and vocational school scholarships to the children and spouses of military personnel.

Those looking to apply to the scholarship can apply via the organization’s website, by May 15, 2015.

MilitaryConnection.com is a proud media sponsor for ThanksUSA.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the ArmyNavyAir ForceMarinesCoast Guard,Guard and ReserveVeterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Boardinformation on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: ThanksUSA Offering Scholarships to the Children and Spouses of U.S. Troops: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: School Boon or Taxpayer Gouge?

helicopter

By Debbie Gregory.

Previously, the Post-9/11 GI Bill had blocked flight training businesses from direct funding because Congress did not want to pay for schools not offering educational degrees. Helicopter schools were struggling financially. But after finding a loophole in the law that allows them to train military veterans completely at government expense, helicopter schools began rapidly expanding. They now collect tens of millions a year in taxpayer dollars.

Under the Post 9/11 GI Bill, the flight schools are allowed to partner with public colleges and universities, many of them community colleges, to offer degrees in aviation. The flight schools work as contractors for the institutions, which keep some portion of the tuition for themselves and pass along the rest to the flight school. The loophole, some critics say, is that there is no cap on what the flight schools can charge for pilot training.

The schools have come under fire from critics who say they are gouging U.S. taxpayers. For two years of training to become a pilot, the government often pays more than $250,000, over twice the amount non-veterans pay at many schools!

With such rich benefits up for grabs, the schools began competing with one another to attract Veterans. Offering costly training on sophisticated helicopters was a powerful recruiting tool.

The colleges oversee the flight programs. They bill the government, collect the money, keep some for tuition and pass the rest to the flight companies.

Officials at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, which administers the GI Bill, were unable to provide the total number of helicopter students across the country or their cost. But as long as the money flows through a public institution, there is no limit on what the VA will pay for flight training.

The main leverage the government has to control program costs is a regulation requiring that non-veterans make up at least 15% of students in VA-funded programs. The intent is to prevent colleges from charging the VA more than non-veterans are willing to pay.

Given their high price, the flight programs have struggled to attract enough non-veterans to satisfy the so-called 85-15 rule.

Sean Heiner, flight program director at Southern Utah University, said the price was “not outrageous” when compared with military spending on pilot training. While there has been substantial growth for some of these companies, it may be short lived. Nearly 7,000 helicopter pilots have left the Army and Navy since 2007, and companies in the private sector in need of pilots may look to those with more hours.

Which begs the question…will there be jobs for these fresh pilots when they graduate?

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: School Boon or Taxpayer Gouge?: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Veterans Flocking to University of Louisville

uofl criminal justice

By Debbie Gregory.

When military veterans separate from active duty, they want their civilian careers to be meaningful and lucrative. They also want to be able to earn a comfortable income, while working in a profession they are passionate about. So for these reasons, before embarking in their new careers, most veterans utilize their service-earned education benefits, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill or Yellow Ribbon program. Finding a college or university can be as challenging as choosing your next profession. But veterans in the know need look no further than the University of Louisville (UofL).

UofL is a member of the Kentucky State University System, with a rich history dating back to 1798. UofL is one of today’s leading schools, attracting students from the entire Commonwealth of Kentucky, all fifty U.S. states, and 116 countries around the globe. UofL’s vast academic program includes bachelor’s degree programs in 70 majors, in addition to 78 master’s degree majors and 22 doctorate programs. UofL also offers a wide array of online programs including bachelor’s and master’s degrees, graduate certificates and teaching endorsements.

Veterans are specially drawn to UofL for the school’s cutting-edge education in disciplines such as Engineering, Criminal Justice and Social Work.

UofL’s J.B. Speed School of Engineering is an excellent option for veteran students. The school offers various degrees in such departments as: Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Fundamentals. Speed School also offers a Master of Engineering in Engineering Management, a Master in Civil Engineering, a Master in Computer Science and various certificate programs completely online.

With many Post-9/11 veterans entering the field of social work or looking for career advancement after active duty service, UofL’s Kent School of Social Work is a top choice for veteran students passionate about helping others live a better, healthier and safer life. Students can earn a bachelor, master or doctorate degree from the Kent School. The Master in Social Work is offered 100% online for those who have a background and college studies in social work and for those who don’t.

Another popular option for veterans is to pursue a career in law enforcement and earn their undergraduate or/and graduate degree in Criminal Justice. This type of degree fits well with the traits and talents that most veterans want to transfer from their active duty to the civilian life. Both criminal justice degrees can be completedonline at UofL, and are designed to prepare professionals to be effective servants and leaders in their communities, state and nation. Commissioner Brewer of Kentucky State Police speaks to the value of earning a degree online at UofL in this video:http://uofl.me/ksp-video-learn.

UofL’s College of Business offers undergraduate degrees in a traditional campus setting. The College of Business also offers options for its Masters of Business Administration (MBA) program, including an Entrepreneurship MBA, Joint MBA programs, and programs suited for both full-time students and working professionals. UofL also offers a Masters of Accountancy program and a Ph.D. in Entrepreneurship program.

According to the VA’s Post-9/11 GI Bill Comparison Tool, there are 919 GI Bill beneficiary students enrolled at UofL. To help meet the specific needs of Veteran students, UofL’s Office of Transfer and Adult Services is prepared to help Veteran students with: securing federal and state educational benefits, obtaining transfer credits from military service, withdrawals/re-admission due to military deployments,identifying resources on and near campus, and promoting academic success for Veterans and their dependents on campus.

UofL is also a proud member of the Yellow Ribbon program, meaning that the school can provide additional support to help veteran students cover the costs of tuition and/or other expenses that could make the cost of an education more than the maximum yearly rate of $20,235.02.

For veterans or dependents who qualify for education benefits and are looking for a top-rated education, UofL and its online programs should be at the top of the list. For more information, please visit them online at www.louisville.edu/online.

Military Connection: Veterans Flocking to University of Louisville: By Debbie Gregory

Military Connection: Legislation Expands Programs for Veteran-Students

Veteran Students

By Joe Silva

On February 26, 2015, legislation was introduced in the U.S. Senate that would reauthorize and improve a grant program designed to assist colleges and universities in establishing, maintaining, improving, and operating Veteran Student Centers.

The Senate bill is titled The Veteran Education Empowerment Act of 2015 S.604 and was sponsored by Senator Jon Tester from Montana.

According to the text in S.604, Congress found that over 1 million Veterans attended college in 2014. Veteran-students face unique challenges that many traditional and even other non-traditional students don’t, including age differences, significant time away from academic life, obligations to their families, and even service-connected disabilities.

Congressionally sponsored studies reported that many Veterans struggle in the classroom and often feel isolated and under served on campus. This leads many Veterans to drop out of college before they complete their desired degree or certification program.

Veterans of the Post-9/11 era have the highest unemployment rate among Veterans. Dropping out of college does not help to improve this statistic.

Studies have shown that among the most beneficial resources for Veteran-students are each other. Veterans on campus provide each other with comradery, a sense of belonging, and serve as mentors to each other. Congressional studies and studies carried out by student groups and educators concur; providing a centralized location on campus for Veteran-students for information, resources, and a hub to connect to other Veterans has proven to increase their academic success.

The Veteran Education Empowerment Act of 2015 would empower the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education to award no more than thirty grants to institutions of higher learning that have a significant population of Veteran-students, and students who are current members of the active-duty military, National Guard or Reserves. The grants would be awarded for periods of four years and will not exceed $500,000 each.

The use of grant funding is to be used to establish, maintain, improve, and operate a Veteran Student Center. Grant recipients can also use portions of the funds to carry out supportive services for Veterans on their campus, such as assistance with admissions and transfer credits.

At the time it was introduced, S.604 was read twice and then referred to the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs.

As a Veteran-student, I can see the benefits in approving the Veteran Education Empowerment Act of 2015. Most of the rules and policies for admissions and tuition payments are unique for Veterans, and not every staff member on every campus knows this. Veteran-students need a place on campus to go to get all of their questions answered by a staff member who knows how their individual school processes benefits.

On behalf of those who served, who are now or will someday be enrolled in college, please contact your senator and tell them to back S.604, the Veteran Education Empowerment Act of 2015 for their constituency.

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Legislation Expands Programs for Veteran-Students: By Joe Silva

Military Connection: Why Choose Veteran-Friendly Schools? By Joe Silva

American Sentinel University Logo

For Veterans, going back to school can be a daunting experience. The first obstacle is selecting the school where you will be using your GI Bill benefits. With so many choices, the selection process can seem like a considerable undertaking. How are Veterans supposed to know which school is the right one?

Steve Hicks retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2006 as a Command Chief Master Sergeant (E-9). Anyone who served should know that someone in Hicks’ pay grade has been there, done that, and should have a pretty good handle on decision making. But in a recent interview, Hicks admitted that like hundreds of thousands of other Veterans, he found the prospect of going back to school intimidating. The Air Force Chief wasn’t sure about how to use his education benefits, or how to start the application/enrollment process.

The one thing that Hicks did know, for sure, was his area of study. Hicks is now enrolled in the Bachelor of Science Geographic Information Systems at American Sentinel University.

“From my job, I knew I wanted a GIS degree,”  CMSgt. Hicks said. “I looked online and found several schools that offered the program. I chose American Sentinel because their military-friendly aspect caught my attention.”

American Sentinel University prides itself on its military-friendly education programs and distance learning. Their military education programs offer an online format that is ideal for military students from any branch of the military, including the Guard and Reserves. Online courses are flexible, and allow for students to log in to their classrooms anomalous to set location or time as with a traditional program. It is for these reasons that American Sentinel University was selected to receive the final Military Connection Veteran School Salute for 2014.

Veterans should take into consideration factors such as: schedules, availability and ability to complete the course when selecting a school and degree program. The staff at American Sentinel University walked Hicks through every step of the admissions and enrollment process, ensuring that he understood and was comfortable with the decisions that he was making.

Hicks said that the online coursework was ideal for his post-military career as a contractor who still deploys. He also said that he had enrolled in one class while he was deployed in Afghanistan. With each online course offering engaging discussion forums, there are ample opportunities to remain connected with the other students and faculty in the class, regardless of where in the world they are. At the start of one particular class, he logged in and saw a familiar name appear in the class discussion board… it was his co-worker, an Army Veteran, in the very next room.

American Sentinel’s commitment to Veterans doesn’t stop once they are enrolled. Hicks said that there is consistent support at the school, and that he was always able to find the answers to any of his questions regarding benefits or academics. Hicks was happy with the support he received from American Sentinel beginning with the very first phone call.

Retired CMSgt. Hicks is scheduled to graduate from American Sentinel University with a B.S. Geographic Information Systems in October 2015. He offered these words of advice to any Veterans thinking about using their GI Bill benefits to go back to school, but who might be feeling intimidated:

“Just do it! Get it started. There are all kinds of reasons to quit or stall your schooling. But you just got to suck it up– adjust your schedule, do whatever it takes to get your education.”

Military Connection proudly serves those who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Guard and Reserve, Veterans and their Families. We are the go to site for Veteran Employment and information on Veteran education. Militaryconnection.com provides Veterans with and Directory of Employers, a Job Board, information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and a blog that offers Veterans boundless information. Be sure to visit Militaryconnection.com, the go to site.

Military Connection: Why Choose Veteran-Friendly Schools? By Joe Silva